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© Bogdan Nowakowski The Motherland Calls You! 1918. Courtesy of The Poster Museum at Wilanów
Poland Regained: Polish Posters from the 1890s to the 1930s

November 19, 2018 - January 31, 2019
December 6, 2018 -- January 6, 2019



Public outdoors space of the Consulate General of the Republic of Poland New York 233 Madison Ave, New York, NY


The Consulate General of the Republic of Poland Chicago | 1530 N Lake Shore Dr The Polish Pastoral Mission of the Holy Trinity | 1118 N Noble St, Chicago




Poland Regained: Polish Posters from the 1890s to the 1930s is a visual link to the centennial celebrations of Poland recovering independence in 1918. The posters featured were made between 1892 and 1939: after the 123-year period of the Partitions (1795-1918), when Poland was gone from the map of Europe, and during the 20 years of its existence as an independent state up until the outbreak of World War II. Exhibition will be on view in the outdoors public exhibition space on the front fencing of the Consulate General of the Republic of Poland from November 19, 2018 to January 31, 2019. Simultaneously, the exhibit will be presented at the Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Chicago on December 6, 2018, and from December 9 to January 6, 2019 it will be on a public display at the Polish Pastoral Mission of the Holy Trinity in Chicago.


Poland Regained includes posters promoting domestic sports and overseas tourism, both growing by leaps and bounds at the time, and offers a look at some charming little-known corners of the country, such as the Ojców and Ciechocinek health resorts. It shows a young state being shaped by the dedication its citizenry, through organizing charity fundraisers, purchasing bonds, supporting the armed forces, and celebrating free access to the sea. The posters also show a darker chapter in Polish history – the German invasion of September, 1939 that set off the Second World War. The posters in this exhibition tell us all these stories in a unique visual language, built through collaborations between outstanding painters and graphic designers, including Wlodzimierz Tetmajer, Bogdan Nowakowski, Zygmunt Glinicki, and Boleslaw Surallo-Gajduczeni.


These posters are a selection of a larger exhibit, co-curated by Izabela Iwanicka and Mariusz Knorowski from Warsaw’s Poster Museum at Wilanów. The exhibit will be presented at the closing celebration of the 30th anniversary of Fundacja Dar Serca (The Gift of Heart Foundation), at the Polish Consulate in Chicago, on December 6, 2018. From December 9 to January 6, 2019, Poland Regained will be available to public view at the Polish Mission of the Holy Trinity (Holy Trinity Catholic Church) located in the oldest Polish district in Chicago. The posters were first showcased at the Polish Embassy in Washington, DC during EU Open House in May 2016.


These posters are found in the Poster Museum in Warsaw’s Wilanów—the oldest museum of its type in the world, opened in 1968. The campus of the Poster Museum, incorporated into the grounds of King John III Sobieski’s country palace, is an archetypal example of Polish modernism. The Museum’s archives contain over sixty thousand artistic, advertising, and propaganda prints from around the world, originating in nearly every culture, with the oldest examples dating back to the origins of the poster as an artistic medium.





Poland Regained: Polish Posters from the 1890s to the 1930s exhibition is created in partnership with the Poster Museum at Wilanów, Poland and the Embassy of The Republic of Poland in Washington, DC., and the Polish Cultural Institute New York.


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